Gilles Lorin photographer printmaker
photographer, alchemist & printmaker
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Portraits

A collection of portraits, captured using the wet collodion process, an early photographic technique invented by Englishman Frederick Scott Archer in 1851. The process involves adding a soluble iodide to a solution of collodion (cellulose nitrate) and coating a glass plate with the mixture. In the darkroom the plate is immersed in a solution of silver nitrate to form silver iodide. The plate, still wet, is exposed in the camera. It is then developed by pouring a solution of pyrogallic acid over it and is fixed with a strong solution of sodium thiosulfate, for which potassium cyanide was later substituted. Immediate developing and fixing are necessary because, after the collodion film had dried, it becomes waterproof and the reagent solutions could not penetrate it. The process was valued for the level of detail and clarity it allowed. (Encyclopædia Britannica)